Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Engineering Research Projects

These links will take you to the specific project pages that are hosted on our college websites.

Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Fatigue Cracking and Prediction of Cyclic Life in Bridge Structures (Daytona Beach)
Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Fatigue Cracking and Prediction of Cyclic Life in Bridge Structures using research innovations in the following three areas: (1) low proof load prediction of ultimate strengths in metal and composite structures, (2) low cycle prediction of fatigue lives in metal structures, and (3) the implementation of in-flight fatigue crack monitoring systems for aging aircraft.
Aerial Robotics Research (Prescott)
Dr. Joe W. Yeol is dedicated to robotics research in general applications and holds particular interest in Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) and Dynamics and Control research working with students.
Aerodynamic Simulation with Structural Behavior (Prescott)
Tom Gally in Aerospace Engineering recently completed a NASA faculty fellowship at NASA Langley. His efforts were primarily focused on coupling aerodynamic simulation with structural behavior. This coupled computational system enables designers to determine the coupled effects of flutter from the aerodynamic loading perspective with the structural mechanics response.
Aeroelastic Gust-Airfoil Interaction Numerical Studies (Daytona Beach)
Air Force/ASEE Summer Faculty (Visiting Scholar with $30-40K contract each year including student support). AFRL and ERAU (Zeus) computer facilities involved in high-accuracy, low-re, aeroelastic gust-airfoil interaction numerical studies.
AIAA Design-Build-Fly (Prescott)
A team of students work together to design, build, and fly an R/C airplane in a competition.
Aircraft Structure Materials (Prescott)
David Lanning of Aerospace Engineering has multiple projects and is working with multiple teams of students. Most of Lanning's research centers around fatigue analysis of aircraft structures. Of particular interest is work that he and students have been doing to determine the effect that foreign object debris (FOD) has on the life of turbine blades. First, his teams inflicts FOD damage on a turbine blade then they test a specimen representative of the blade through about a million cycles of load to determine if the fatigue life has deteriorated associated with the damage inflicted on the blade.
Aircraft Design Optimization (Prescott)
Mark Sensmeier of Aerospace Engineering has spent multiple summers at NASA Langley working in a variety of areas. Currently he and his student team are working on optimization ideas for aircraft design.
Aluminum Droplet Combustion (Daytona Beach)
A microscale computational study, with University of Florida, to simulate the burning of aluminum particles explosively dispersed in air
Application of Aircraft Fatigue Prediction Technology to the Florida Infrastructure Transportation System (Daytona Beach)
Application of Aircraft Fatigue Prediction Technology to the Florida Infrastructure Transportation System using research innovations in the following three areas: (1) low proof load prediction of ultimate strengths in metal and composite structures, (2) low cycle prediction of fatigue lives in metal structures, and (3) the implementation of in-flight fatigue crack monitoring systems for aging aircraft.
ASCEND (Prescott)
Students research and build a payload that will conduct experiments in the upper atmosphere.
Bistatic Radar (Daytona Beach)
Faculty in the Electrical, Computer, Software, and Systems Engineering Department at Embry-Riddle are developing a new radar that may alter the paradigm of locating aircraft.
Blind signal separation in dynamic environments (Daytona Beach)
Blind source separation (BSS) is a powerful statistics analysis tool capable of revealing hidden mechanisms and source signals from their combinations. It has a wide variety of practical applications in areas like image and speech processing, telecommunications, financial engineering, biomedical signal processing, and text document analysis, etc.
Computational Fluid Dynamics (Prescott)
Shigeo Hayashibara of Aerospace Engineering is working in multiple areas. Most recently he and a team of students used Computational Fluid Dynamics and a wind tunnel to test and help design an aerial refueling probe. In addition, Hayashibara is working with the Center for Teaching and Learning to use streaming video to enhance instruction methods in the classroom. He and his students are also designing a computer cluster to add to the supercomputing environment on campus.
Conjugate Heat Transfer (Daytona Beach)
Development of computational tools for empirical convection and solid conduction heat transfer, and software interfaces with WIND-US CFD code.
A Curriculum Wide Software Development Case Study (Daytona Beach)
This NSF funded research develops case studies of software development for use in software engineering instruction . Products include realistic projects, complete artifacts throughout the software development life cycle, case studies decoupled from a particular text book, and case modules designed with varying complexity allowing for use in multiple classes throughout undergraduate and graduate curricula.
Development of an Engineering Qualification Model (Daytona Beach)
PI – ERAU Internal Grant for the “Development of an Engineering Qualification Model for a 3U CubeSat.” ($10,000)
EAGER Towards Complete MAV Control Using Arrays of Synthetic Jets (Daytona Beach)
EAGER: Towards Complete MAV Control Using Arrays of Synthetic Jets: Preliminary Study NSF proposal, PI, $70K.
Eagle Aerospace Rockets (Prescott)
Christian Phillips leads a group of students to design and build high-power rockets to compete in inter-collegiate competitions.
Eaglesat Solar Power (Prescott)
Darin Baker is researching and building solar panels to fly on the ERAU Eaglesat Cubesat
EcoCAR IDEA (Daytona Beach)
The Intelligent Drive Efficiency Assistant (IDEA) is a product under development as part of the EcoCAR Competition. Unlike traditional hybrid control systems, which are typically reactive, IDEA attempts to identify up-coming driving conditions and make recommendations to the hybrid system’s supervisory control unit.
Encouraging Students to Pursue an Engineering Education and Career (Daytona Beach)
This NSF-sponsored project provides scholarship for engineering students pursuing degrees in computer science, computer engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and software engineering. Working closely with faculty and student mentors, scholarship recipients are involved in multi-disciplinary projects involving unmanned and autonomous systems throughout their four years of undergraduate study
Engineering Global Leaders (Daytona Beach)
In this multi-institution engineering mobility project sponsored by the Fund for Improving Post-Secondary Education of the US Department of Education, participating students and faculty concentrate on engineering education and research by supporting study abroad.
Evaluation of residual strength of Beechcraft Bonanza spar carry-through with fatigue cracks (Daytona Beach)
A number of Beechcraft Bonanza aircraft have been plagued with cracks on their front spar carry-through structure. The cracks primarily form on the front shear panel of the structure in the general vicinity of the so-called huck bolts. ERAU was contracted in September 2010 to investigate the residual strength of the main spar carry-through.
FAA NextGen Task K Demonstration of Flight Data Object Planning (Daytona Beach)
Dr. Stansbury of the ECSSE Department is working in collaboration with the Florida NextGen Testbed to support FAA NextGen Task K. Task K involves the preparation for a Pacific regional demonstration of the Flight Data Object (FDO).
Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion Technology (Daytona Beach)
Florida Center for Advanced Aero-Propulsion Technology, funded by the State of Florida: Amount: About one Million $ over three year period.
From Middle School to Industry Vertical Integration to Inspire Interest in Computational Thinking (Daytona Beach)
While students typically do not see immediate advantages of the topics being studies, top down integration exposes students to larger, more complex projects, giving them better appreciation for topics as they realize the “big picture.” Funded by the National Science Foundation, this research seeks to vertically integrate software development best practices from industry to graduate, undergraduate, high school, and middle school academic programs, with the intention of increasing student interest in computing and computational thinking.
Fuel Slosh Research in Microgravity (Daytona Beach)
Spring 2010 marks the fifth year Embry-Riddle’s COE has launched students to do research in a zero-gravity environment under the leadership of Dr. Sathya Gangadharan.
Green Airplane Challenge (Daytona Beach)
Dr. Anderson is the team leader for the Green Airplane Challenge. He is the ERAU lead for the real green airplane project, the alternative lead free bio fuel for reciprocating engine airplanes.
Green Flight Challenge (Daytona Beach)
ERAU students are currently working on the Green Flight Challenge, a competition sponsored by NASA and hosted by the CAFE Foundation that promotes more environmentally friendly means for aircraft transportation.
LED Technology for Airport Lights (Prescott)
Steve Kahne of Electrical Engineering has been working with airport authorities to test the feasibility of using LED technology to replace airport runway lights. His efforts have involved leading a group of researchers from multiple universities to address the electrical as well as human factors considerations of runway lighting.
Marine Turbines (Daytona Beach)
Professor Tang and her team are analyzing the application of autonomous turbines with so-called "swarm intelligence" that can navigate through the ocean currents, similar to a school of fish searching for food.
ME431 Hybrid Rocket (Prescott)
Students from Dr. Fabian's Propulsion Detail Design class are designing and building a hybrid rocket.
Neural Network Ultimate Strength Prediction in Impact Damaged Composite Specimens Using Acoustic Emission Data (Daytona Beach)
Neural Network Ultimate Strength Prediction in Impact Damaged Composite Specimens Using Acoustic Emission Data using research innovations in the following three areas: (1) low proof load prediction of ultimate strengths in metal and composite structures, (2) low cycle prediction of fatigue lives in metal structures, and (3) the implementation of in-flight fatigue crack monitoring systems for aging aircraft.
NexGen Aeronautics (Daytona Beach)
NexGen Aeronautics, “STTR: Robust Analysis and Prediction for Integrated Design of Structures (RAPIDS), Phase II” (Co-PI with $30-40K contract each year including student support). PACL and Zeus computer facilities involved in MPI implementation of NASA’s CAP-TSD aeroelastic predictions code.
NextGen Task E (Daytona Beach)
The FAA’s NextGen Task E is a series of demonstrations incorporating NextGen technologies into today’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Working with AAI’s Shadow and General Atomics Predator B / Guardian, Task E make four-dimensional flight control, Cockpit Display of Traffic Information, and Voice-over-IP radio technologies available in the ground control station of an unmanned aircraft.
NextGen Task G (Daytona Beach)
NextGen Task G focuses on using time based metrics to improve delivery accuracy of an aircraft at a specific point in space. The project studies the feasibility and effects of assigning Required Time of Arrival (RTA) requirements to aircraft. The flight trajectory is thus considered a 4-Dimensional (4D) object, and air traffic control shifts to Trajectory Based Operations (TBO).
NOAA UAS for In-Situ Tropical Cyclone Sensing (Daytona Beach)
For this project, Embry-Riddle faculty and students are collaborating with the sponsor, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, to produce an unmanned aircraft supporting in-situ sensing of a tropical cyclone environment near the ocean surface.
PHLEX (Daytona Beach)
The goal of this project is to create a new test system capable of fatigue testing wind turbine blades approximately three times faster and more accurately than existing test systems.
Pitch Motion Stability in Elliptic Orbits (Daytona Beach)
Co-PI with Prof. Mancas (Math) on Florida Space Grant: “Pitch Motion Stability in Elliptic Orbits.” ($15,000)
Project Haiti (Daytona Beach)
Through Project Haiti, our students have a hands-on experience not only developing clean energy products in the form of a solar water purifier, but in directly having an impact on the world.
Project Icarus Developing an Inexpensive Sounding Rocket for Space Research Payloads (Daytona Beach)
Project Icarus: Developing an Inexpensive Sounding Rocket for Space Research Payloads using research innovations in the following three areas: (1) low proof load prediction of ultimate strengths in metal and composite structures, (2) low cycle prediction of fatigue lives in metal structures, and (3) the implementation of in-flight fatigue crack monitoring systems for aging aircraft.
Remote Airfield Lighting System (Daytona Beach)
There are many remote airfields that are not connected to the power grid. Providing adequate lighting to these airfields is necessary and challenging. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has sponsored a research project, Remote Airfield Lighting Systems (RALS), through the Center for General Aviation Research (CGAR).
Remote Airport Lighting Systems (Daytona Beach)
In association with the University of Alaska, Anchorage, the University of North Dakota, and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, ERAU engineers have developed a highly innovative system for providing lighting at remote airport landing strips for the FAA Center of Excellence for General Aviation. Dr. Christopher Grant, a professor of Civil Engineering at ERAU, and his co-investigators have been researching more environmentally and economically friendly methods to improve night-time safety at small general aviation airports since 2005.
Satellite Research (Prescott)
Ron Madler of Aerospace Engineering spent summer 2005 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory working with a team of students on a satellite project.
Scramjet Engine Simulation (Daytona Beach)
Dr. Engblom and his research assistants have been on the front-line of scramjet engine development since 2006 with continuous funding from the Department of Defense.
SETI (Daytona Beach)
Dr. Barott is a research engineer with the SETI Institute for the Allen Telescope Array, a large radio telescope located at the Hat Creek Observatory. Dr. Barott is the lead engineer for the array's beamformer, an instrument that combines the receiving sensitivity of 42 independent antennas into a single data stream using high-speed FPGAs.
Software Safety (Prescott)
Matthew S. Jaffe (UCI): Specific interests include requirements engineering practices for safety critical software systems.
Spacecraft Attitude Control Simulator (Prescott)
Students planned, designed, and built a simulator than can adjust its roll, ya, and pitch.
Team Lyoko (Prescott)
Students build a can-shaped payload to be launched in June 2013.
VEX Robotics (Prescott)
Four students build two robots to compete in a VEX Robotics Competition in March
Web-based tool for outcomes-based assessment (Daytona Beach)
As part of an internally funded grant, faculty members in the ECSSE Department are developing a new web-based tool for assessment of student performance toward learning and curriculum assessment outcomes. The tool will allow teachers to produce online quizzes and exams. The instructor can define the solution and associated outcomes for each question. After the exam, the web tool shall grade all submissions and provide reports regarding the class’s overall performance toward each outcome.
Wireless Sensors for Aircraft (Daytona Beach)
With the advance of new technologies, more and more sensors will be employed in various aircrafts to improve the safety, capacity, efficiency, and environmental friendliness of air transportation.